DNS

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How to install DNS server on CentOS 5.

Published February 18, 2010 by Siva

In the first time, you must download core software of this service, that are

  1. bind
  2. caching-nameserver
  3. bind-chroot

You can download this software by this command,

# yum -y install bind caching-nameserver bind-chroot

After you downloaded , you can setup follow this instruction :

1. Check your hostname by this command :

# uname -n
dns.aoddy.com

2. Edit /etc/named.conf

options {
directory “/var/named”;
forwarders {WWW.XXX.YYY.ZZZ;}; // IP of ISP
// query-source address * port 53;
allow-query { localhost; 192.168.0.0/24;};
// query range
allow-transfer { localhost; 192.168.0.0/24;};
// transfer range
allow-recursion { localhost; 192.168.0.0/24;};
// recursion range
};
controls {
inet 127.0.0.1 allow { localhost; } keys { rndckey; };
};
// here is the section for internal informationsview “internal” {
match-clients {
localhost;
192.168.0.0/24;
};
zone “.” IN {
type hint;
file “named.ca”;
};
zone “mysite.com” IN {
// for common resolving
type master;
file “mysite.com.fwd”;
allow-update { none; };
};
zone “0.168.192.in-addr.arpa” IN {
// for reverse resolving *note
type master;
file “mysite.com.rev”;
allow-update { none; };
};
zone “localdomain” IN {
type master;
file “localdomain.zone”;
allow-update { none; };
};

zone “localhost” IN {
type master;
file “localhost.zone”;
allow-update { none; };
};

zone “0.0.127.in-addr.arpa” IN {
type master;
file “named.local”;
allow-update { none; };
};

zone “255.in-addr.arpa” IN {
type master;
file “named.broadcast”;
allow-update { none; };
};

zone “0.in-addr.arpa” IN {
type master;
file “named.zero”;
allow-update { none; };
};

};

// here is the section for external informations
view “external” {
match-clients {
any;
};

zone “.” IN {
type hint;
file “named.ca”;
};

zone “server-linux.info” IN {
// for common resolvin
type master;
file “server-linux.info.wan”;
allow-update { none; };

};

zone “80.0.16.172.in-addr.arpa” IN {
// for reverse resolving *note
type master;
file “80.0.16.172.db”;
allow-update { none; };
};
};
include “/etc/rndc.key”;

2. Create /var/named/mysite.com.fwd


$TTL 86400
@ IN SOA dns.mysite.com. root.aoddy.com.(
1997022700 ; Serial
28800 ; Refresh
14400 ; Retry
3600000 ; Expire
86400 ) ; Minimum
IN NS dns.mysite.com.
IN MX 10 dns.mysite.com.
IN MX 20 web.mysite.com.
IN A 192.168.0.2
dns IN A 192.168.0.2
web IN A 192.168.0.3

3. Create file /var/named/aoddy.com.rev


$TTL 86400
@ IN SOA dns.aoddy.com. root.mysite.com.(
1997022700 ; Serial
28800 ; Refresh
14400 ; Retry
3600000 ; Expire
86400 ) ; Minimum
IN NS dns.aoddy.com.
IN MX 10 dns.mysite.com.
IN MX 20 web.mysite.com

IN PTR dns.mysite.com.
2 IN PTR dns.mysite.com.
3 IN PTR web.mysite.com.

4. Start service

# service named restart

5. Test this server can resolve domain&ip

[root@dns named]# nslookup
> dns.mysite.com
Server: 192.168.0.2
Address: 192.168.0.2#53
Name: dns.mysite.com
Address: 192.168.0.2
> 192.168.0.2
Server: 192.168.0.2
Address: 192.168.0.2#53

2.0.168.192.in-addr.arpa name = dns.mysite.com.
>

6. If your service can’t resolve , you can check on your file config by this command :

# named-checkconf

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